Fall 2014 Classes

Registration for Fall 2014 classes is up! If you’re an ’18, join professor Lindsay Whaley for his classic What’s the Point of Education? A Christian Perspective, just for freshmen. Ryan Bouton D’01 will be teaching a reading group through C.S. Lewis’ classic The Abolition of Man, a paradigm-shifting book on education, morality, objectivity and what it means to be human. Or explore the short stories of Flannery O’Connor—often dark fiction, and profoundly influenced by her Christian faith—with Catalina Gorla D’09. Classes will begin on October 7, and continue through October 28. Full course descriptions for each of the three classes being offered this term are available below. Click here to sign up.

What’s the Point of Education? A Christian Perspective
Lindsay Whaley, Professor of Linguistics and Classics and Interim Vice Provost
Tuesdays 10/7 – 10/28, 7:00 – 8:30 pm in Reed Hall

The Abolition of Man: A Reading Group
Led by Ryan Bouton D’01
Tuesdays 10/7 – 10/28, 7:00 – 8:30 pm in Reed Hall

Flannery O’Connor and Christian Realism
Led by Catalina Gorla D’09
Tuesdays 10/7 – 10/28, 7:00 – 8:30 pm in Reed Hall

The Abolition of Man

abolition_of_man_791Led by Ryan Bouton ’01
TA: TBA
Tuesdays 7:00 – 8:30 pm, 10/7 – 10/28, Reed Hall

Description: Join us for a book discussion group on C.S. Lewis’ Abolition of Man, in which he explores human nature, the existence of objective morality, and the implications of how we view these for individuals, societies, and especially education. The book promises to promote relevant, engaging discussion as we think about how faith, reason, and vocation fit together at Dartmouth and beyond.

Click here to sign up.

What’s the Point of Education? A Christian Perspective (for freshmen)

Seminar for Freshmen
Led by Lindsay Whaley, Interim Vice Provost and Professor of Classics & Linguistics
TAs: Jess Tong ’17 and Steffen Eriksen ’17
Tuesdays, 7-8:30pm, 10/7 – 10/28

College freshmen are faced with a maze of decisions, from which classes to take, to which activities to join, to which friends to spend time with. Author Stephen Covey reminds us that successful people begin with the end in mind. So is there an ultimate goal in going to college? How should that shape our decisions? Should our religious beliefs be part of our education, or something to keep distinct? In this four-week introductory class for first-year students, Christian alumni and faculty will join us to discuss the nature of a liberal arts education, the relationship between faith, reason, and vocation, and how the Christian faith informs our vision for learning.

Click here to sign up.

Flannery O’Connor and Christian Realism

Led by Catalina Gorla ’09 and Laura Marshall
TA: TBA
Tuesdays 7:00 – 8:30 pm, 10/7 – 10/28, Reed Hall

Description: Flannery O’Connor is acclaimed as one of the best short-story writers of the 20th century, and one of the most famous southern writers of all time. Her fiction, usually categorized as “Southern Gothic”, is often disturbing: loss of cat leads to murder of entire family, stolen mummy given as present, infatuated woman cares for corpse. Yet when O’Connor describes her own work, she sees her Catholic faith as one of the most important influences on her writing. What is the relationship between her dark fiction, so highly regarded by religious and non-religious critics alike, and her faith? This class will consider the relationship between Christian faith and fiction writing in a selection of O’Connor’s short stories and essays.

Click here to sign up.

Spring 2014 Classes

Registration for Spring 2014 classes is up! The Development of Doctrine will be continuing into the Middle Ages and Reformation, Hayden Kvamme and Chris Hauser will be leading a reading group on C.S. Lewis’ classic The Abolition of Man, and four exceptional teachers will be teaming up to teach a new class on hymns. Classes will begin next Tuesday, 4/8, and continue for either three or four sessions. Full course descriptions for each of the three classes being offered this term are available below. Click here to sign up. And spread the word!

The Development of Doctrine, Part II: Middle Ages and Reformation
Led by Rev. Don Willeman
Tuesdays 4/8 – 4/29, 7:00 – 8:30 pm in Reed Hall

The Abolition of Man: A Reading Group
Led by Chris Hauser ’14 and Hayden Kvamme ’14
Tuesdays 4/8 – 4/22, 7:00 – 8:30 pm in Reed Hall

Hymns of the Christian Church
Co-taught by Gregg Fairbrothers, Cora Koop and Catalina Gorla
Tuesdays 4/8 – 4/29, 7:00 – 8:30 pm in Reed Hall

 

The Development of Doctrine II: Middle Ages and Reformation

Rev. Don Willeman, Pastor of Christ Redeemer Church

Tuesdays, 7-8:30pm, 4/8-4/29, Reed Hall

This class provides a general overview of the history of the church during the medieval period and the Reformation. In particular, it will focus on theological controversies, what spawned them, and the creedal/confessional statements that were developed in response. We will consider the theology of sin and grace, the development of the medieval sacramental system, the Reformation, and the different branches of the Reformation throughout Europe. Students will gain a basic knowledge of church history, and an understanding of central issues of historic Christian theology.

This class is a continuation of last term’s Development of Doctrine I: The Ancient Church, but is open to all students and community members. (textbook available for purchase)

Click here to sign up.